Safer Together: A National Action Plan to Advance Patient Safety

Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)

Safer Together: A National Action Plan to Advance Patient Safety provides clear direction that health care leaders, delivery organizations, and associations can use to make significant advances toward safer care and reduced harm across the continuum of care. This resource also includes a Self-Assessment Tool & Implementation Resource Guide. Resource also includes case examples on engaging patients and families in safety.

Hospital Roadmap for Person and Family Engagement (PFE): Achieving the Five PFE Best Practices to Improve Patient Safety and Health Equity

American Institutes for Research (AIR)/IPRO HQIC

This PFE Roadmap provides practical guidance to help hospitals implement five PFE best practices:

  1. Implementation of a planning checklist for patients who have a planned admission
  2. Implementation of a discharge planning checklist
  3. Conducting shift change huddles and bedside reporting with patients and families
  4. Designation of a PFE leader in the hospital
  5. Active Person and Family Engagement Committee or other committees where patients are represented and report to the board

All-Cause Harm Resource

This resource explains what All-Cause Harm is, why it is important and then dives into each of the processes it takes to prevent All-Cause Harm. Eight priority focus areas for the Hospital Quality Improvement Contract (HQIC) are illuminated and strategies to monitor compliance are provided.

All-Cause Harm Resource, Recording and Slides from the IPRO HQIC All-Cause Harm “launch” on March 29th, 2021.

Eliminating Disparities to Advance Health Equity and Improve Quality

MHA Keystone Center

The MHA Keystone Center encourages organizations to use this guide to assess the current level of hospital implementation around key strategies aimed at reducing disparities to achieve equity and improving quality. This resource will guide organizations to prioritize and act on identified gaps so that deliberate and purposeful action is taken to ensure that the outcomes across all patient populations are equitable. Sections of the guide include:

Section 1: Understanding Key Terms

Section 2: Why Equity in Care Matters

Section 3: Strategic Pillars on the Journey Toward Equity

Section 4: Recommendations for Action

Section 5: Levels of Implementation

Section 6: The MHA Keystone Center’s Dedication to

Achieving Health Equity

Section 7: Resource Compendium

Training and the Culture of Learning: Health Equity Resource Series

American Hospital Association (AHA) Institute for Diversity and Health Equity (IFDHE)

To support hospitals and health systems starting from different points on their journey to achieve health equity, the AHA’s Institute for Diversity and Health Equity (IFDHE) is releasing a series of toolkits to share evidence-based practices to inform organizational next steps for the following topics:

  • Data collection, validation, stratification and application of patient information to address disparate outcomes
  • Cultural humility and implicit bias training and education
  • Diversity and inclusion in leadership and governance roles
  • Sustainable community partnerships focused on improving equity

Each toolkit is designed to be informative, whether organizations have already deployed health equity tactics and strategies or if they are at the early stages of implementation. Each helps lay the groundwork for an in-development equity roadmap to support hospitals’ and health systems’ efforts toward achieving high-quality, equitable care for all. This toolkit focuses on training and education strategies and approaches to encourage cultural humility and overcome implicit bias.

Opioid Stewardship: IPRO HQIC, Learning and Action Network (LAN)

IPRO Hospital Quality Improvement (HQIC), Learning and Action Network (LAN) webinar on the All-Cause Harm focus are of Opioid Stewardship: April 26th 2021.

IPRO HQIC presented aggregate baseline data on the Opioid Stewardship Hospital Baseline Assessment and heard from a rural hospital on promoting the safe use of opioids (prescribing policy, scripted communication tools, alternatives to opioids, tracking prescribing practices, referral network for pain management, and MAT therapy).

In addition, IPRO HQIC highlight many salient opioid stewardship resources on processes that support the inclusion of patient and family engagement and health equity (stigma) in opioid stewardship efforts. These resources further support IPRO HQIC hospital efforts in All-Cause Harm reduction.

Recording, Slides and All-Cause Harm Resource available.

MODERNIZING HEALTH CARE TO IMPROVE PHYSICAL ACCESSIBILITY

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

The resources in this inventory include guidance on how to increase physical accessibility of medical services, tools to assess your practice or facility’s accessibility for individuals disabilities, and tips and training materials to support efforts to reduce barriers and improve quality of care. This document is intended to provide recommendations on how to improve accessibility in order to improve quality of care for patients with disabilities.

Using Data to Reduce Disparities and Improve Quality

Advancing Health Equity (AHE)

Unless specifically measured, disparities in health and healthcare can go unnoticed even as providers, health plans, and governmental organizations (hereafter referred to as healthcare organizations) seek to improve care. Stratifying quality data by patient race, ethnicity, language and other
demographic variables such as age, sex, health literacy, sexual orientation, gender identity, socio-economic status, and geography is an important tool for uncovering and responding to healthcare disparities. This brief is organized into these three topics and recommends strategies that healthcare organizations can use to effectively organize and interpret stratified
quality data to improve health equity for their patients. It is intended for healthcare organizations and collaboratives that already have quality data stratified by one or more demographic variables. However, there are many resources on how to best collect and stratify race, ethnicity, language (R/E/L), sexual orientation, gender identity (SOGI) and other demographic data. Using stratified quality data strategically allows healthcare organizations to:

  1. Discover and prioritize differences in care, outcomes, and/or experiences across patient groups
  2. Plan Equity-Focused Care Transformations and Measure Impact
  3. Tell the story of how patients experience health care

GRACE Team Care Model: Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders (GRACE)

Agency Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) & Indiana University School of Medicine’s Center for Aging Research

Designed as a promising solution to the health and health care challenges faced by low-income seniors with multiple chronic conditions, researchers at Indiana University developed the GRACE Team Care model  to assist primary care physicians (PCPs) working with low-income seniors to optimize health and functional status, decrease excess usage of health care services, and prevent unnecessary long-term nursing home placement.

COVID-19 Resources on Vulnerable Populations

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health (CMS OMH)

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health (CMS OMH) has compiled Federal resources on the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) to assist our partners who work with those most vulnerable—such as older adults, those with underlying medical conditions, racial and ethnic minorities, rural communities, and people with disabilities.

Protocol for Responding to and Assessing Patients’ Assets, Risks, and Experiences (PRAPARE)

National Association of Community Health Centers

Set of national core measures as well as a set of optional measures for community priorities. It was informed by research, the experience of existing social risk assessments, and stakeholder engagement. It aligns with national initiatives prioritizing social determinants (e.g., Healthy People 2020), measures proposed under the next stage of Meaningful Use, clinical coding under ICD-10, and health centers’ Uniform Data System (UDS).

Complex Care at NYC H+H: Operational Guide to Identify, Understand, and Treat High-Need Patients

NYC Health & Hospitals

This guide features open-source implementation tools which could be customized, and used to support other health system’s efforts to identify, understand, and treat patients with complex needs.
This guide provides step-by-step guidance on:
1) Risk scoring and stratification: using data and analytics to identify patients with complex needs;
2) Segmentation: combining analytics with clinical insight to understand patients with complex needs; and
3) Targeting: tailoring care models to fit needs and behaviors of patients with complex needs.