WHO Global Guidelines for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection.

World Health Organization

The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) Global guidelines for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) are evidence-based and unique in that they are the first global guidelines of this sort, are based on systematic reviews and present additional information in support of actions to improve practice. They were developed by international experts adhering to WHO’s Guideline Development Process and overall aim to achieve standardization.

Surgical Site Infection Investigation Tool

(AHRQ) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

This tool will help your safety program team understand lapses in infection prevention processes that may have contributed to the surgical site infection case. It can help your team identify practice patterns and inconsistencies in practice, so you can more easily pinpoint opportunities for intervention

WHO Global Guidelines for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection

World Health Organization

The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) Global guidelines for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) are evidence-based and unique in that they are the first global guidelines of this sort, are based on systematic reviews and present additional information in support of actions to improve practice. They were developed by international experts adhering to WHO’s Guideline Development Process and overall aim to achieve standardization.

AORN Comprehensive Surgical Checklist

AORN

The AORN Comprehensive Surgical Checklist can be downloaded and customized to meet a facility’s needs. The checklist includes key safety checks as outlined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist and The Joint Commission Universal Protocol. It is designed for use in all types of facilities (eg, hospital ORs, ambulatory surgery settings, physician offices)

The Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Elective Colon Surgery

Pubmed Article

Infections at the surgical site continue to occur in as many as 20% of elective colon resection cases. Methods to reduce these infections are inconsistently applied. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the result of multiple interactive variables including the inoculum of bacteria that contaminate the site, the virulence of the contaminating microbes, and the local environment at the surgical site. These variables that promote infection are potentially offset by the effectiveness of the host defense. Reduction in the inoculum of bacteria is achieved by appropriate surgical site preparation, systemic preventive antibiotics, and use of mechanical bowel preparation in conjunction with the oral antibiotic bowel preparation. Intraoperative reduction of hematoma, necrotic tissue, foreign bodies, and tissue dead space will reduce infections. Enhancement of the host may be achieved by perioperative supplemental oxygenation, maintenance of normothermia, and glycemic control. These methods require additional research to identify optimum application. Uniform application of currently understood methods and continued research into new methods to reduce microbial contamination and enhancement of host responsiveness can lead to better outcomes.

HQIC Antibiotic Stewardship Workgroup- Clostridioides difficile Module

Prepared by IPRO QIN/QIO

Video interview with a nurse describing her own C.  difficile survival story. The story includes a first-person accounting of her yearlong hospitalization, the impact of antibiotic therapy, prevention of C. difficile and the long-term effects of this devastating antibiotic adverse event.