8 Lessons from a Covid-19 Surge Hot Spot

Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI)

This resource discusses surge preparedness and 8 key takeaways or lessons learned by a major healthcare system who was at the epicenter of the US Covid crisis. Even the most sophisticated trend analysis can only estimate how health care systems need to prepare for taking care of higher numbers of patients with COVID-19. Many across the globe are drawing on the best information available to date to guide preparations for an expected surge of patients in need of hospital-level care.

Guidance for Planning Vaccination Clinics Held at Satellite, Temporary, or Off-Site Locations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The purpose of this resource is to provide guidance to assist with jurisdictional planning and implementation of satellite, temporary, or off-site vaccination clinics by public and private vaccination organizations. Other users may include public health preparedness professionals. The guidance primarily focuses on clinical considerations for planning a vaccination clinic, including vaccine storage, handling, administration, and documentation. 

National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN): How to Use the Patient Impact and Hospital Capacity Module

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion and the CDC

As part of CDC’s ongoing COVID-19 response, a new Patient Impact Module has been created in NHSN to help facilities track and monitor the number of cases reported in their facilities daily. The new module collects summary data which can be viewed in a table form without generating new analysis datasets. In addition, the summary data can be exported to excel/CSV for additional analysis outside the application. The data collected using this module will be informative and provide situational awareness at both state and national levels.

Exploring Sepsis Strategies-Part 2: Care Coordination & Preventing Sepsis-Related Readmissions

This material was prepared by Telligen in partnership with IPRO HQIC, the Hospital Quality Improvement Contractor, under contract with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

This is the second session in a two-part series webinar on Sepsis from September 30th. View the recording, as well as the questions and answers presentation slide deck.

This session focuses on preventing sepsis-related harm and avoidable readmissions using effective care coordination and hand-off strategies to the next level of care provider.

HQIC Webinar, November 4, 2021: Antibiotic Stewardship During A COVID Pandemic

Prepared by IPRO HQIC

This resources includes a recording and presentation slides from a November Webinar on Antibiotic Stewardship During the Covid Pandemic.

Antibiotic Stewardship (AS) is a national priority aimed at optimizing the use of antibiotics to effectively treat infections, protect patients from harms caused by unnecessary antibiotic use, and combat antibiotic resistance. Hospital AS programs and teams have been challenged during the COVID pandemic to manage both viral and bacterial infections in patients for extended lengths of stay.

Screening for Social Determinants of Health in Populations with Complex Needs: Implementation Consideration

Authors: Caitlin Thomas-Henkel and Meryl Schulman, Center for Health Care Strategies

This resource examines how organizations participating in Transforming Complex Care, a multisite national initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, are assessing and addressing Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) for populations with complex needs. It reviews key considerations for organizations seeking to use SDOH data to improve patient care.

Included: 1) selecting and implementing SDOH assessment tools 2) collecting patient level information related to SDOH; 3) creating workflows to track and address patient needs; 4) identifying community resources and tracking referrals.

Person and Family Engagement Implementation Guides for Hospitals

Developed by the American Institute of Research (AIR) in partnership with IPRO HQIC

This resource provides hospital leaders and staff with practical, step-by-step guidance to successfully implement the 5 PFE Best Practices in the CMS-funded Hospital Quality Improvement Contract (HQIC) program. Each guide walks the user through the definition of the PFE Practice, the intent of the Practice, the benefits of partnering with patients and families to increase safety in the hospital setting, concrete examples from the field, and a list of resources to support implementation. These guides are meant to be a supplement to the Hospital Roadmap for Person and Family Engagement.

Guide Practice 1 Preadmission Planning Checklist

Guide Practice 2 Discharge Planning Checklist

Guide Practice 3 Shift Change Huddles and Bedside reporting

Guide Practice 4 Designated PFE Leader

Guide Practice 5 PFAC or Representatives on Hospital Committee

Optimal Z Code Utilization & Reimbursement Opportunities, Webinar, December 7, 2021, 11 AM

An IPRO NQIIC Health Equity Cross-Task Event

This resource provides a recording and slides from a webinar presentation on how healthcare organizations can play an important role in advancing the collection of social determinants data and how these social risk factors impact patient health and quality of life. Additionally, the presenters provide valuable information on optimal Z code use for reimbursement.

IPRO HQIC December 2021 LAN: Partnership in Action: Bedside Shift Change & Reporting

The American Institutes for Research (AIR) and the IPRO Hospital Quality Improvement Contractor (HQIC)

The American Institutes for Research (AIR) and the IPRO Hospital Quality Improvement Contractor (HQIC) gathered hospitals that have successfully implemented shift change huddles or bedside reporting in partnership with patients and families. This LAN event included a facilitated discussion among attendees about the top barriers to implementing this practice in their hospitals and the steps hospitals can take today to overcome those barriers. This resource includes a recording of the LAN event and accompanying slides.

Joint HQIC 4-Part Series: Workplace Violence Prevention

Prepared by the HQIC collaborative group (IPRO, Alliant, Compass, and Telligen)

Defined as “violent acts, including physical assaults and threats of assault, directed toward persons at work or on duty,” workplace violence (WPV) is a growing concern.1 An April 2020 Bureau of Labor Statistics Fact Sheet revealed that healthcare workers accounted for 73% of all nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses due to violence in 2018. This number has been steadily growing since tracking these specific events began in 2011.2

Now, it is time to act!
Why Now? According to OSHA (2016)3, workplace violence rates among healthcare workers between 1993 and 2009 were 20% higher than that for other industries. The COVID-19 pandemic increased the factors leading to workplace violence, such as staffing shortages leading to a decrease in the amount of staffed (available) beds, a high workload causing stressed staff, and frustrated patients and families who feel as though their needs are not being met. A memo to State Survey Agency Directors dated November 28, 2022, states CMS’ continued enforcement of regulatory expectations that patients and staff have an environment that prioritizes their safety while effectively delivering healthcare.2 To effectively maintain a safe environment for healthcare delivery, hospitals can develop policies and procedures to mitigate the risk of workplace violence.


The HQIC collaborative group consisting of Alliant, Compass, IPRO and Telligen appreciates your interest in the Workplace Violence Prevention series. Access event materials here:

Part 1:  Workplace Violence Prevention (WPV): Best Practices for Safer Care

  • WPV is defined as an act or threat occurring at the workplace from physical and verbal assaults.
  • 2020 Bureau of Labor Fact Sheet found that health care workers accounted for 73% of all nonfatal workplace injuries and illness due to violence in 2018.
  • WPV prevention takes more than security.  Requires commitment from organizational leadership, interdisciplinary, collaboration and allocation of resources.
  • It is an investment in our workforce not a cost.

SLIDES.

Part 2:   Key Components of an Effective Workplace Violence Prevention Program: Leadership Engagement and Communication

  • Workplace violence is more than a written Policy, it is a series of action steps that serve as a foundational guide for educating staff and acting quickly in an emergency.
  • Communication is critical. WPV prevention policies must be communicated to patients and families in a way that is non-threatening, clear, concise and at the appropriate reading level.   
  • The way an organization addresses WPV AFTER an event (debriefing, counseling, performance improvement action plan) is just as important as how your organization responds during the event.
  • Leadership is a partnership. At the heart of all good policies, procedure, and programs is good two-way communication. Find what’s missing by including all perspectives.

SLIDES.

Part 3:   Uncovering Unconscious Bias for Safer Healthcare Interactions

  • Unconscious bias affects healthcare interactions and can lead to poor, inequitable outcomes.
  • Self-reflection is crucial for bias identification and improvement.
  • De-escalation must be a priority to promote safe, healing environments.
  • Organizations must implement training, diversity initiatives, reporting mechanisms, and community engagement to address and mitigate bias in healthcare.

SLIDES.